HECUA classrooms

When White Wokeness Comes at the Expense of People of Color

HECUA programs offer students a chance to think deeply about the issues that matter most, and we’d like to share a piece of that experience with you. This semester, students in our Inequality in America, Art for Social Change, and Making Media, Making Change programs are writing a series of blog posts on a topic of […] Read More »

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HECUA classrooms

Optional Student Services Fees Harm Students’ Mental Health

Admitting you have a problem is hard. Asking for help is harder. Figuring out where to find that help is even more challenging. When it comes to mental health, it comes as no surprise that university students experience intense levels of stress and subsequent mental health issues like depression and anxiety Read More »

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HECUA classrooms

A New Normal: Megan’s story

HECUA programs offer students a chance to think deeply about the issues that matter most, and we’d like to share a piece of that experience with you. This semester, students in our Inequality in America, Art for Social Change, and Making Media, Making Change programs are writing a series of blog posts on a topic of […] Read More »

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HECUA classrooms

An Open Letter from HECUA student Ashton

HECUA programs offer students a chance to think deeply about the issues that matter most, and we’d like to share a piece of that experience with you. This semester, students in our Inequality in America, Art for Social Change, and Making Media, Making Change programs are writing a series of blog posts on a topic of […] Read More »

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HECUA classrooms

Toxic Masculinity + Domestic Violence in the Trump Era

We need to dismantle these harmful projections of gender roles on our culture. Assigning only certain behaviors to men and women is extremely harmful because it ostracizes those who do not fit the roles they are given. Read More »

HECUA classrooms

HECUA classroom series: No Room for Error

I mean that I was about 75% leaning towards the liberal approach, with the other 25% of me saying that you still have to work hard to be successful. Essentially what it boils down to is the structure vs. agency argument. This is where it got tricky for me, because I felt very strongly that if someone worked hard, they could at least achieve a decent standard of living. What I didn’t always factor into the equation was the fact that sometimes things don’t always go as planned. Read More »

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HECUA classrooms

HECUA classroom series: Growing up Filipino(ish)

I am a Filipina-American because the combination of these two places is the only way describe who I am. I am Filipina in my love of food and people. I am Filipina, because my second name, Mara, has just as much importance as my first because it is a recognition of my late Grandfather (Lolo), Mauro Victa whose birthday I share. I am American because I stand up for what I believe in and stubbornly push forward until I have my way. Read More »

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HECUA classrooms

HECUA classroom series: Intersectional feminism and surviving abuse.

Applying this intersectional lens to this topic of abuse was odd for me. I know that my life, and lens in which I view the world is different than my mom’s, but to realize that her whiteness accelerated her escape from abuse, but my blackness, womanhood, and past experience with abuse could have potentially shoved me back into the cycle, with less likelihood of coming out, is flooring. Read More »

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HECUA classrooms

HECUA Classrooms series: These Shoes Project

Kaitlyn Gayle Howell is an intern at Avalon School. She asks various students if it would be ok to take a photo of their shoes, and to ask a few questions about them. For the next five to twenty minutes, students talk not only about their shoes but also their life story. Read More »

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HECUA classrooms

HECUA classroom series: This is Someone’s Life.

This is not an immigration crisis, it is a humanitarian crisis. The presence of immigrants in this country has nothing to do with problems on the US-Mexico border, and everything to do with the borders within our hearts. Read More »

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